php version (7.2.34) does not satisfy that requirement.

When i download the Laravel project from Github and setup project i run composer update its showing this types of error

Problem 1
- Root composer.json requires php ^7.3|^8.0 but your php version (7.2.34) does not satisfy that requirement.
Problem 2
- phpro/grumphp[v1.0.0, ..., v1.1.0] require php ^7.3 -> your php version (7.2.34) does not satisfy that requirement.
- phpro/grumphp[v1.2.0, ..., v1.3.1] require php ^7.3 || ^8.0 -> your php version (7.2.34) does not satisfy that requirement.
- Root composer.json requires phpro/grumphp ^1.0 -> satisfiable by phpro/grumphp[v1.0.0, ..., v1.3.1].

Let open editor and run below

composer install --ignore-platform-reqs

Thanks

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Perforce client version numbers v99999

rajeshkumar created the topic: Perforce client version numbers v99999
The mystery v99999 is an artifact of how older releases of the p4 command line client set the protocol level. In the code, it looked something like this:

client.SetProtocol( “api”, “99999” );

In the absence of better version information, the server logs the API protocol level, or if that’s not set, the client protocol level. Since 2004.2 p4 always sets the API level to 99999, so it’s a version of p4 that was built after that, but before they introduced an explicit version string (2005.2). So basically if you see v99999 it’s either a 2004.2, or 2005.1 p4.

reference:
kb.perforce.com/article/512
Regards,
Rajesh Kumar
Twitt me @ twitter.com/RajeshKumarIn

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Interview Questions and Answer for Perforce Version Control Tool

perforce-interview-questions-answers

Some of the perforce commands which is not commonly used but useful.
p4 annotate – Print file lines along with their revisions.
e.g p4 annotate file.c

How to ignore files/folder in perforce workspace/client?
Assuming you have a client named “CLIENT”, a directory named “foo” (located at your project root), and you wish to ignore all .dll files in that directory tree, you can add the following lines to your workspace view to accomplish this:

-//depot/foo/*.dll //CLIENT/foo/*.dll
-//depot/foo/…/*.dll //CLIENT/foo/…/*.dll

The first line removes them from the directory “foo” and the second line removes them from all sub directories. Now, when you ‘Reconcile Offline Work…’, all the .dll files will be moved into “Excluded Files” folders at the bottom of the folder diff display. They will be out of your way, but can still view and manipulate them if you really need to.

You can also do it another way, which will reduce your “Excluded Files” folder to just one, but you won’t be able to manipulate any of the files it contains because the path will be corrupt (but if you just want them out of your way, it doesn’t matter).

-//depot/foo.../*.dll //CLIENT/foo.../*.dll

Reference
How can I exclude a directory from a Perforce command?

P4IGNORE
Specify a file that contains a list of files to ignore when adding files to the depot and reconciling workspaces.
Reference

How to check last 10 submitted, pending, or shelved changelists that include any file under the project directory?
p4 changes -m 5 //depot/project/…

How to check last 10 submitted or pending, or shelved changelists that include any file under the project directory?
p4 changes -m 1 -s submitted | pending | shelved

Interview Questions Related to Perforce Admin

  1. How to take perforce backup
  2. How to restore perforce backup
  3. How to verify health of the perforce repos database
  4. What is the ise of p4 dbverify and p4 verify

What is the use of p4 admin commands.

The p4 admin command allows Perforce superusers to perform administrative tasks even when working from a different machine than the one running the shared Perforce service.
p4 [g-opts] admin checkpoint [ -z | -Z ] [ prefix ]
p4 [g-opts] admin journal [ -z ] [ prefix ]
p4 [g-opts] admin stop
p4 [g-opts] admin restart
p4 [g-opts] admin updatespecdepot [ -a | -s type ]
p4 [g-opts] admin resetpassword -a | -u user
Reference – Click here

How to remove files from perforce permanently?
p4 archive -p with caution. This is the one of only two commands in Perforce that actually removes file data. (The other command that removes file data is p4 obliterate.)

How to set properly in Perforce?
The Perforce service offers three ways of storing metadata: counters/keys, attributes, and properties.

If your application requires only the flat storage of simple key/value pairs, and attempts to implement no security model, use the p4 counters and p4 keys commands.

The p4 property command can be used by administrators to view and update property definitions stored in the Perforce service. The service does not use the property definitions; it provides this capability for other Perforce applications, such as P4V

If your application’s metadata is associated with particular files, use p4 attribute.

If your application’s metadata is not associated with files, and if you have a requirement to restrict its visibility to users, groups, and/or to control the precedence of multiple values using sequence numbers, use p4 property.

p4 property -n name -v value
p4 counter mycounter 123
p4 key mykey 12
p4 attribute -n name [ -v value ] files…

Perforce Integration with other Tools

  1. Gitfushion
  2. Swarm
  3. Replication
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How to Select the Right Software version Control Product?

software-version-control-product

Original link: http://www.cmcrossroads.com/cm-articles/275-articles/14286-selecting-the-right-software-version-control-product

Selecting the Right Software Version Control Product Written by Mike Feighner For many years, I worked loyally for the same company where my expertise was restricted to one single software version control tool—the one that was already in place. I was not involved with determining whether the selected tool was appropriate for the company’s needs; my role was to learn it well and use it within the accepted standards, guidelines, and internally approved processes. When I recently found myself back in the job market, I realized that there were many other version control tools in use in the industry. I then began to consult with other engineers in the field and gathered data from them on which version control tools their organizations were using and the selection criteria they used in choosing a version control tool for their organization. This experience opened up a whole new world for me and soon I realized that selecting and implementing the right tools was essential for the success of any software or systems development effort. From this experience, I have drawn up a checklist of version-control-tool criteria to aid an organization in selecting the best tool. Although there are many good descriptions available on the Internet about the many tools currently on the market, I do not recommend one specific tool over the other, because some tools may fit great in one organization, but fail in another. My goal here is to suggest a partial framework for deciding which tool best fits your needs while at the same time adhering to configuration management best practices. First, you will need to define your organization’s goals, which could include any or all of the following: Good documentation should accompany your tool purchase. The tool should be portable to more than one platform. If your organization is spread out over different time zones or even across international borders, your tool should support a multi-site rather than a single-site function. The cost should be affordable. The tool should be easy to use. The tool should easily support branching and merging. The tool should have the ability to lock a file when being edited to prevent two engineers from editing the same file simultaneously. The tool should be able to accurately merge changes between two or more files. The tool should log a history of changes with notes on who made the change and why the change was made. The tool should have the ability to establish immutable baselines. Next, you will need to review your organization’s requirements for software version control and carefully review the various software tools on the market to determine which one best matches your organization’s needs. Some may be better suited for your project than others. Selecting the wrong tool can have devastating effects on your team’s effort. Lack of a good version control tool can be a major cause for delays and problems during your organization’s application development. The project will run over cost and behind schedule and can be prone to risks associated with the manual management and distribution of your project’s dependencies. Unauthorized changes and results will occur, and the customer will not be satisfied. The tool you select should not impede the implementation of configuration management best practices, which serve as a means to add value to the process, improve quality, and increase productivity. The following are some, but not all, of the questions you will need to consider. Documentation Is the tool well documented? Is support documentation available on this tool’s installation and for the tool’s use by both administrators and developers? As a reference manual, the tool’s documentation should adequately describe the tool’s features—each dialog box, tab, field, button, etc. It should answer a user’s questions about completing a specific task in a clear and concise way. Frequently, the user documentation is available in the tool’s help pull-down menu or can be downloaded electronically from the vendor’s website. Portability Is the tool portable? Can it be used on multiple platforms and operating systems? From a business perspective, your software team will be supporting a broad user market occupying various platforms, including Windows, Mac OS, or some flavor of UNIX. Your tool should be compatible on any of these platforms, as each release will simultaneously need a separate version to support each platform of your user base. Multi-site vs. Single Site Is your team located at one location site, or is your team globally distributed across the nation and across different time zones throughout the world? A “single site” constitutes one physical location such as a single building or office. A “multisite” constitutes an organization in more than one office or location in a single time zone, in multiple time zones within one country or in multiple countries. If your organization is spread out over various time zones or even across international borders, your tool should support a multi-site rather than a single-site function. A multi-site project established as a set of several individual independent single-site systems would be prone to added costs and risks associated with the manual management and distribution of the project’s dependencies. Life for a multisite organization would be a lot easier to maintain a single multisite system with access to one shared repository. A single-site organization would be wise to select a single-site system over the additional costs of a multi-site system Cost What are the costs and terms of licensing of the tool? Is it something your organization can afford? Generally, a tool designed for a large organization will have a much larger cost than one designed for a smaller organization. No one should assume paying a higher cost for your tool will solve all of your problems. Even a high cost tool may fall sort of satisfying your organization’s needs. Your decision should consider overall cost and your organization’s needs. Supporting your organization’s needs should never be underfunded. Ease of Use How easy is it to install and deploy the system? Will the tool be dependent on other tools to conduct software builds, or are some of these capabilities already an integral part of the tool? Is this a tool that is easy to use from the first day of installation throughout the entire development lifecycle? Will training and customer support be available? Will the tool require training an in-house administrator dedicated to the administration of the tool? If you are not able to immediately pick up a source code management system and start building your site, odds are it is not entirely user friendly. Ultimately, the key to a successful deployment of a source code management system is reliability and ease-of-use. A tool that is difficult to use will likely conceal the functional benefits that it would otherwise provide. If training is an affordable option for your organization, consider whether it is available through the vendor or through an unbiased third party. For a lower-cost approach in the long term, consider sending a representative from your organization to a vendor training event who will later write up a training program for your own company-based organization. Branching Does the tool accommodate branch creation? The capability to create a branch should allow duplication of an object under revision control. Thus, code modifications can happen securely in parallel along both branches at the same time whether the change involves adding a new requirement or attempting to resolve an issue from an earlier release. The tool you select should support your particular choice of branching strategy, be it by revision or release via a simple copybranch or by creating adelta branch off of the main branch or trunk. Or the tool may go a step further by creating streams that include supporting metadata and workflow automation as an enhancement in managing multiple variants in the code. Branching is one of the most important features to consider in your choice of a good source control management system as it allows you to easily support at the same time the same source code and a parallel subset of the same code being modified securely to support either a new requirement or a bugfix from an earlier release. Merging Does the tool allow merges of changes and assists in resolving conflicts between different edits to the same file? Can a merge be done via a graphical user interface or on a command line? Take into consideration that merging concurrent changes made by different developers can increase the amount of effort to resolve conflicts and achieve a merge safely. The best advice in such cases is to merge little and merge often. File Locking Does the system have a means of preventing concurrent access to the same file? Does it prevent more than one user at a time from writing to the file until the current user either checks in the file or cancels the checkout? History of Changes Does the tool maintain a log of the history of changes? Can the tool display the history of changes graphically, as in a version tree? Does the tool easily identify the current baselined version and list previous baselined versions? A history change log that maintains accurate records facilitates traceability through the code’s lifecycle, from its beginning to its eventual release and beyond. A change history log can trace a change back its origins to who made the change and to the authority who authorized the change. It plays a vital role in baselining the code. This is a basic requirement of any organization wishing to maintain proper controls and compliance. Baselining Baselining, also known as setting a control point for your code, lets you know the exact versions of all source code and other configuration items that were included in a release. Does the tool have a way of baselining the code (be it via labeling, tagging, or snapshots) to a particular version that would allow us to back out and return to the previous baselined version in the event of a problem? Is the baseline immutable? If the tool allows changes to the previously released baseline, it jeopardizes the integrity of the software. A baseline must be locked down to prevent modifications. Any subsequent release should be based on a previously release baseline. Conclusion No one software version control tool can possibly fit every organization’s needs. There is no one size fits all. The right tool should help you safeguard your code and help your process improve productivity and quality. Remember that thorough evaluation and selection of the right tool will require funding, but this vetting must stay within your organization’s budget. Careful selection of the appropriate version control tool will help your firm improve productivity and quality and ensure that you are adhering to industry standards regarding configuration management best practices. About the Author Mike Feighner has more than twenty years’ experience in information technology in the aerospace industry, including more than ten years in configuration management. Mike graduated from San Jose State University with a bachelor’s degree in German and has a master’s degree in political science from the University of Tübingen in Germany and a master’s degree in software engineering from National University.

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IBM Rational ClearCase Version 7.1.1 release | Rational ClearCase New Version

ibm-rational-clearcase
ibm-rational-clearcase


IBM Rational ClearCase Version 7.1.1 release

This information provides a brief description of the new features and restrictions in IBM Rational® ClearCase® Version 7.1.1
What’s New

For a list of new features available in this release, see What’s New
Announcement
The Rational ClearCase Version 7.1.1 announcement is available at www.ibm.com/common/ssi/index.wss. See the announcement for the following information:

Detailed product description, including a description of new functions
Product-positioning statement
Packaging and ordering details
International compatibility information

System requirements

For information about hardware and software compatibility, see the detailed system requirements document at http://www-1.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?rs=0&uid=swg21302974 .
Installing Rational ClearCase Version 7.1.1
For installation instructions, see this topic in the information center:

http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/cchelp/v7r1m0/index.jsp?topic=/com.ibm.rational.clearcase.cc_ms_install.doc/topics/c_deploy_container.htm

Known problems

Known problems are recorded in individual documents in the Support knowledge base. As problems are discovered and resolved, the knowledge base is updated and maintained with new information. By searching the knowledge base, you can quickly find workarounds or solutions to problems. To learn about the known limitations and problems in this update, and any workarounds that are available, see: http://www.ibm.com/support/search.wss?&q=clearcase+RN7.1.1.
iFixes and Fixpacks
To learn about features and fixed defect fixes in Fixpack and iFixes:

Go to http://www.ibm.com
Click Support & downloads
In the Select product or service type for support box, select the software category and then the product category.
Under Choose your task on the left side, click Downloads.
In the Featured download links box, click View all download links.
Click the link for an iFix or Fixpack.

Source: Click here

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Perforce New Version , Perforce 2011.1 released | Perforce 2011.1 Overview

perforce-20111-version

Perforce 2011.1 released 11/07/2011

Perforce Release 2011.1 is now available. Check for platform and component availability.

Source: http://www.perforce.com/aggregator/sources/2

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Stable CVS Version 1.11.23 Released, What’s new in Perforce CVS 2011.1, let’s find?

stable-cvs-version-1.11.23

Stable CVS 1.11.23 has been released. Stable releases contain only bug fixes from previous versions of CVS. This version includes an efficiency fix that reduces checkouts of very old revisions from an O(n^2) operation to an O(n) one, as well as yet another Windows file time stamp handling fix (bug #22781), and some other minor fixes and efficiency improvements. We recommend this upgrade for all CVS clients and servers!

Please take a look at the NEWS file from the CVS source distribution and the CVS 1.11.23 manual for more information about the changes contained in this release.

CVS can be downloaded from the GNU download server within four hours of this announcement or one of the mirrors after 24 hours or so (make sure to check the ”’non-gnu”’ directory on the mirrors). (This release may be obtained from Savannah download server prior to appearing on the GNU download server, but please don’t use the already heavily loaded Savannah download server unless you have to.) For other ways to obtain CVS, please read How to get GNU Software.

URL: http://savannah.nongnu.org/projects/cvs

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Power Point PPT: Version Control With CVS – Complete Guide

version-control-with-cvs

Power Point PPT: Version Control With CVS

 

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Apache Continuum Version 1.3.6 Beta 1 – What’s new in Apache Continuum ?

apache-continuum-version-136-beta-1

The Apache Continuum team have released a beta of Apache Continuum 1.3.6.

Apache Continuum is a continuous integration server, which offers automated builds, role-based security, release management and integration with build tools and source control management systems. The project aims to improve quality and maintain a consistent build environment.

This beta introduces updates to the error handling if deleting a project fails, and has fixed the invalid links when generating pdf of continuum-docs. Untested platforms have been removed from the installation docs, and the LDAP configuration documentation has been updated.

A PDF version of the Continuum docs is planned for some point in the future. See the Release Notes for more information.

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Why Worry About Versioning? – Versioning Complete guide

versioning

Why Worry About Versioning?

Having a good version scheme for your software is important for several reasons. The following are the top five things a version scheme allows you to do (in random order):

Track your product binaries to the original source files.

Re-create a past build by having meaningful labels in your source tree.

Avoid “DLL hell” —multiple versions of the same file (library in this case) on a machine.

Help your setup program handle upgrades and service packs.

Provide your product support and Q/A teams with an easy way to identify the bits they are working with.

So, how do you keep track of files in a product and link them back to the owner? How can you tell that you are testing or using the latest version of a released file? What about the rest of the reasons in the list? This chapter describes my recommendations for the most effective and easiest way to set up and apply versioning to your software. Many different schemes are available, and you should feel free to create your own versioning method.

Ultimately, like most of the other topics in this book, the responsibility to apply versioning to the files in a build tends to fall into the hands of the build team. That might be because it is usually the build team that has to deal with the headaches that come from having a poor versioning scheme. Therefore, it is in their best interest to publish, promote, and enforce a good versioning scheme. If the build team does not own this, then someone who does not understand the full implications of versioning will make the rules. Needless to say, this would not be desirable for anybody involved with the product.

File Versioning

Every file in a product should have a version number; a four-part number separated by periods such as the one that follows seems to be the established best practice. There are many variations of what each part represents. I will explain what I think is the best way of defining these parts.

Major version— The component owner usually assigns this number. It should be the internal version of the product. It rarely changes during the development cycle of a product release.

Minor version— The component owner usually assigns this number. It is normally used when an incremental release of the product is planned instead of a full feature upgrade. It rarely changes during the development cycle of a product release.

Build number— The build team usually assigns this number based on the build that the file was generated with. It changes with every build of the code.

Revision— The build team usually assigns this number. It can have several meanings: bug number, build number of an older file being replaced, or service pack number. It rarely changes. This number is used mostly when servicing the file for an external release.

Build Number

Each build that is released out of the Central Build Lab should have a unique version stamp (also known as the build number). This number should be incremented just before a build is started. Don’t use a date for a build number or mix dates into a version number simply because there are so many date formats out there that it can be difficult to standardize on one. Also, if you have more than one build on a given date, the naming can get tricky. Stick with an n=n+1 build number. For example, if you release build 100 in the morning and rebuild and release your code in the afternoon, the afternoon build should be build 101. If you were to use a date for the build number, say 010105, what would your afternoon build number be? 010105.1? This can get rather confusing.

It is also a good idea to touch all the files just prior to releasing the build so that you get a current date/time stamp on the files. By “touching” the files, I simply mean using a tool (touch.exe) to modify the date/time stamp on a file. There are several free tools available for you to download, or you can write one yourself. Touching the files helps in the tracking process of the files and keeps all of the dates and times consistent in a build release. It also eliminates the need to include the current date in a build number. You already have the date by just looking at the file properties.

In addition, try to avoid tools that inject version numbers into binaries (as a post-build step). Although the tools might seem reliable, they introduce an instability factor into your released binaries by hacking hexadecimal code. Most Q/A teams become distressed if this happens to the binaries they are testing—and justifiably so. The build number should be built into the binary or document files.

Source Code Control Trees

All the source code control (SCC) software that I have seen has some kind of labeling function to track either checked-in binaries or source code. (Remember that I am not for checking in binaries, but I mention this for the groups or teams that do. This type of versioning (or more appropriately named labeling) is typically used to track a group of sources that correspond to a product release. Most of the time, they combine labeling of the sources with the branching of the source code lines.

Should There Be Other Fields in the File Version Number?

I am of the opinion that no, there shouldn’t be other fields in the file version number. Let’s look at some other fields that might seem like they should be included but really don’t need to be:

  • Virtual Build Lab (VBL) or offsite development group number— You can use this number to track a check-in back to a specific site or lab that the code was worked on. If you have a golden tree or mainline setup, and all your VBLs or offsite trees have to reverse integrate into the golden tree, this extra field would be overkill. That’s because you can trace the owner through the golden tree check-in. Having a field in which you would have to look up the VBL or offsite number would take just as long.

    The reality is that when you check a version number, you won’t care where the file came from. You’ll only care if it is a unique enough number to accurately trace the file to the source that created it. Most likely, you’ll already know the version number you’re looking for and you’ll just need to confirm that you’re using it.

  • Component—If you break your whole project into separate components, should each component have its own identification number that would be included in the version string? No, similarly to the reasons in the previous bullet, you can track this information by the name of the binary or other information when checking the other properties of the file. This information would probably only come into play if you were filing a bug and you had other resources available to determine which component this file belonged to.
  • Service Pack Build Number— If you’re doing daily builds of a service pack release, you should use the earlier example; increment the build number and keep the revision number at the current in-place file build number. This seems like a good argument for a fifth field, but it isn’t if the revision field is used properly.

 

DLL or Executable Versions for .NET (Assembly Versions)

This section applies to you only if you are programming in .NET.

When Microsoft introduced .NET, one of its goals was to get rid of DLL hell and all the extra setup steps I talk about later in this chapter. In reviewing where .NET is today, it looks like Microsoft has resolved the sideby-side DLL hell problem, but now the problem is “assembly version hell.” Without going into too much detail about the .NET infrastructure, let’s touch on the difference between file versioning and assembly versioning.

Assembly versions are meant for binding purposes only; they are not meant for keeping track of different daily versions. Use the file version for that instead. It is recommended that you keep the assembly version the same from build to build and change it only after each external release. For more details on how .NET works with these versions, refer to Jeffrey Richter’s .NET book. Don’t link the two versions, but make sure each assembly has both an assembly version and a file version when you right-click. You can use the same format described earlier for file versioning for the assembly version.

How Versioning Affects Setup

Have you ever met someone who reformats his machine every six months because “it just crashes less if I do” or it “performs better?” It might sound draconian, but the current state of component versioning and setup makes starting from scratch a likely solution to these performance issues, which are further complicated by spyware.

Most of the problems occur when various pieces of software end up installing components (DLLs and COM components) that are not quite compatible with each other or with the full set of installed products. Just one incorrect or incorrectly installed DLL can make a program flaky or prevent it from starting up. In fact, DLL and component installation is so important that it is a major part of the Windows logo requirement.

If you are involved in your product’s setup, or if you are involved in making decisions about how to update your components (produce new versions), you can do some specific things to minimize DLL hell and get the correct version of your file on the machine.

Installing components correctly is a little tricky, but with these tips, you can install your components in a way that minimizes the chance of breaking other products on your own.

Install the Correct Version of a Component for the Operating System and Locale

If you have operating system (OS)-specific components, make sure your setup program(s) check which OS you are using and install only the correct components. Also, you cannot give two components the same name and install them in the same directory. If you do, you overwrite the component on the second install on a dual-boot system. Note that the logo requirements recommend that you avoid installing different OS files if possible. Related to this problem is the problem caused when you install the wrong component or typelib for the locale in use, such as installing a U.S. English component on a German machine. This causes messages, labels, menus, and automation method names to be displayed in the wrong language.

Write Components to the Right Places

Avoid copying components to a system directory. An exception to this is if you are updating a system component. For that, you must use an update program provided by the group within Microsoft that maintains the component.

In general, you should copy components to the same directory that you copy the EXE. If you share components between applications, establish a shared components directory. However, it is not recommended that you share components between applications. The risks outweigh the benefits of reduced disk space consumption.

Do Not Install Older Components Over Newer Ones

Sometimes, the setup writer might not properly check the version of an installed component when deciding whether to overwrite the component or skip it. The result can be that an older version of the component is written over a newer version. Your product runs fine, but anything that depends on new features of the newer component fails. Furthermore, your product gets a reputation for breaking other products. We address the issue of whether it makes sense to overwrite components at all. But if you do overwrite them, you don’t want to overwrite a newer version.

“Copy on Reboot” If Component Is in Use

Another common mistake is to avoid dealing with the fact that you cannot overwrite a component that is in use. Instead, you have to set up the file to copy on reboot. Note that if one component is in use, you probably should set up all the components to copy on reboot. If you don’t, and if the user doesn’t reboot promptly, your new components could be mixed with the old ones.

Register Components Correctly; Take Security into Account

Sometimes setups don’t properly register COM components correctly, including the proxy and stub. Note that Windows CE requires that you also register DLLs. Note, too, that when installing DCOM components, you must be vigilant about permissions and security.

Copy Any Component That You Overwrite

It is smart to make a copy of any component that you overwrite before you overwrite it. You won’t want to put it back when you uninstall unless you’re sure that no product installed after yours will need the newer component—a difficult prediction! But by storing the component in a safe place, you make it possible for the user to fix his system if it turns out that the component you installed breaks it. You can let users know about this in the troubleshooting section of your documentation, the README file, or on your Web site. Doing this might not save a call to support, but it does at least make the problem solvable. If the component is not in use, you can move it rather than copying it. Moving is a much faster operation.

Redistribute a Self-Extracting EXE Rather Than Raw Components

If your component is redistributed by others (for instance, your component is distributed with several different products, especially third-party products), it is wise to provide a self-extracting EXE that sets up your component correctly. Make this EXE the only way that you distribute your component. (Such an EXE is also an ideal distribution package for the Web.) If you just distribute raw components, you have to rely on those who redistribute your components to get the setup just right. As we have seen, this is pretty easy to mess up.

Your EXE should support command-line switches for running silently (without a UI) and to force overwriting, even of newer components, so that product support can step users through overwriting if a problem arises.

If you need to update core components that are provided by other groups, use only the EXE that is provided by that group.

Test Setup on Real-World Systems

If you’re not careful, you can install all your setup testing on systems that already happen to have the right components installed and the right registry entries made. Be sure to test on raw systems, on all operating systems, and with popular configurations and third-party software already installed. Also, test other products to make sure they still work after you install your components.

Even Installing Correctly Does Not Always Work

Even if you follow all the preceding steps and install everything 100 percent correctly, you can still have problems caused by updating components. Why? Well, even though the new component is installed correctly, its behavior might be different enough from the old component that it breaks existing programs. Here is an example. The specification for a function says that a particular parameter must not be NULL, but the old version of the component ran fine if you passed NULL. If you enforce the spec in a new version (you might need to do this to make the component more robust), any code that passes NULL fails. Because not all programmers read the API documentation each time they write a call, this is a likely scenario.

It is also possible for a new version to introduce a bug that you simply didn’t catch in regression testing. It is even possible for clients to break as a result of purely internal improvements if they were relying on the old behavior. Typically, we assume that nothing will break when we update a component. In fact, according to Craig Wittenberg, one of the developers of COM who now works in the ComApps group at Microsoft, if you don’t have a plan for versioning your components in future releases, it is a major red flag for any component development project. In other words, before you ship Version 1, you need to have a plan for how you will update Version 1.1, Version 2, and beyond—besides how to bug-fix your updates.

Reference: The Build Master: Microsoft’s Software Configuration Management Best Practices

 

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